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Thank you to everyone who attended the 11th Annual Salt Lake County Watershed Symposium! This free two-day conference encourages a comprehensive review of the current state of our watershed while creating learning opportunities for a diverse array of stakeholders. Sessions covered a broad range of topics on water quality and watershed issues with local, regional, and national relevance. Hosted by Salt Lake County Watershed Planning & Restoration.

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"The Symposium is tremendously important to the future of all of Utah. You guys are educating stakeholders across Northern Utah in an objective, user-friendly way about issues, problems and concerns that are not being discussed publicly anywhere else."  -Zach Frankel, Utah Rivers Council


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Wednesday, November 15 • 2:20pm - 2:50pm
Creating a Native Prairie Landscape within a Concrete Jungle

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Creating a Native Prairie Landscape within a Concrete Jungle

Summary:
A traditional regional stormwater facility has been revitalized to a more natural landscape featuring a meandering stream, native vegetation, and a trail system. This presentation will highlight key design and stormwater management aspects.

Full:
In 2008, the City of Fargo, ND Park District constructed a regional stormwater pond treatment system to treat urban runoff from neighboring developing areas. Over time, the detention basins have degraded leading the Park District to work on revitalizing the area. Construction has begun on a revitalization design that converts the stormwater ponds into a native prairie and meandering stream landscape. In addition to providing stormwater management and ecological restoration, the site provides a unique opportunity for education and recreation. The old detention basins will be converted to four smaller ponds connected by the meandering stream. A recirculation lift station within the pond-channel system will provide a baseflow during dry periods. Native vegetation, pedestrian trials, and bridges will be integrated within the original pond footprint. The overall system will still be able to operate as a pond during large rain events. These updates allow for a greater mix of native plant species improving local biodiversity. Our presentation will focus on the key stormwater design aspects and discuss similarities to the numerous urban parks throughout Salt Lake County’s riparian areas.

Speakers
ZM

Zach Magdol

Water Resources Engineer, AE2S
Zach earned a Master's from the U where he research Red Butte Creek. Currently, Zach works as a water resources engineer for a civil engineering consulting firm. His projects include stormwater management and design and floodplain analysis.



Attendees (19)